Table of Contents

    Emergency Contact Phone Numbers

    IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY DIAL 9-1-1

    Scouts First Hotline-----------------------------------------------------------------------------844-726-8871

    Blessing Hospital (Quincy)---------------------------------------------------------------------217-223-1200

    Keokuk Area Hospital--------------------------------------------------------------------------319-524-7150

    Coast Guard (Keokuk)--------------------------------------------------------------------------319-524-7511

    Adams County Sheriff--------------------------------------------------------------------------217-277-2200

    Hancock County Sheriff------------------------------------------------------------------------217-357-2115

    Quincy Service Center--------------------------------------------------------------------------217-224-0204

    2522 Locust Street Quincy, IL 62301

    Burlington Service Center----------------------------------------------------------------------319-754-8413

    3007 Flint Hills Drive Burlington, IA 52601

    Camp Eastman----------------------------------------------------------------------------------217-847-2770

    750 E. County Rd 1780 Nauvoo, IL 62354

    Saukenauk Scout Reservation------------------------------------------------------------------217-985-4983

    2948 E. 1000th  Street Mendon, IL 62351

     

    Mississippi Valley Council Contacts:

    Ricci Dula, Scout Executive---------------------------------------------------------------------217-224-0204 (W) 909-528-5471 (C)

    Heather Huebner, Cub Scout Adventure Camp Director/Program Director---------217-224-0204 (W) 319-316-3144 (C)

    J. David Gilbert, Scouts BSA & Webelos Adventure Camp Director-------------------314-805-0168 (C)

    Dr. Doug Peters, Council Physician-------------------------------------------------------------319-759-6093 (C)

    CE Emergency Action Plan

    The best way for your unit to keep safe during severe weather or during emergencies at camp is to “Be Prepared”.  Discuss this plan in detail during a unit meeting and make sure that families know the process as well.  Because most severe weather will take place during early evening or night, you should make yourself very familiar with the following procedures and designated areas.  There will be a separate plan for designated areas that happen during program times.  Those will be gone over in detail during the Leader meeting at camp.

    We will be running a mock drill starting approximately 5:30 p.m. the Sunday of Summer Camp.

    Severe Weather:

    Severe Thunderstorm Warnings, High winds, heavy rains, flash flooding, Tornado Warnings, etc

    1. Leaders will be informed of severe weather warnings and by Camp Management or Staff.
    2. When instructed by staff or continuous siren, leaders will gather Scouts and go to designated area making sure to keep close count of all Scouts and leaders. In the case of flash flooding, units will be informed and told to stay out of flash flooding areas.

    Leaders need to make sure that Scouts stay calm and stay together and have a complete count of Scouts and Leaders and immediately report any missing Scout or Leader.

    1. The following areas have been designated for emergencies:
      1. Eastman Lodge basement (Staff row, Wrens, Bluff, Woodcraft, Squirrels)
      2. Shower house (Herons, Pawnee, Apache, Cheyenne)
      3. The concrete rooms under the Nature building (Owls, Indian Point, Cherokee, Redwing)

    Upon arrival to your designated spot, please do a head count of all Scouts and Leaders and report to the staff person in charge.  Have all youth sit away from any windows when possible and help keep Scouts calm

    1. When “All Clear” has been sounded or announced by Camp Management, report to the flag pole for head count and instructions from the Camp Director

    Fire:

    In the event of a fire (pulse sounding siren), campers and staff will assemble at the flag pole and take a headcount.  If the flag area is inaccessible, camp will assemble at the Archery Range.

    Visitors at Camp:

    Visitors at camp are always welcome but should notify the unit leadership.  All visitors must check-in and out at the Trading Post.  Once signed in, a wrist band indicating them as an authorized visitor will be distributed and worn at all times.  If a Scout or a Leader notices an unauthorized visitor in camp (has no visitor band, camper wristband, or staff identification) they are to report it to Camp Management IMMEDIATELY.  ALL UNAUTHORIZED VISITORS WILL BE ASKED TO SIGN IN AND OUT OF CAMP OR ASKED TO LEAVE CAMP IMMEDIATELY.  Overnight guests cannot be accommodated unless they are a registered camper.

    Release of Campers:

    If a camper must leave camp for any reason, they will need to have a formed filled out by the leader at camp and on file with the Camp Office.  This form will state the purpose and will also name who may and may not pick up the camper.  Camp management should be informed of special circumstances.   The adult picking up the camper must present a picture ID and also sign and date the release form.

    Verification of absent Scouts/ no-shows:

    During check-in, leaders will review and correct the roster for any absent Scouts or no-shows.  Leaders should be aware of why a Scout did not show for camp or be able to announce when they will be arriving.

    High Temperatures

    Summer temperatures can soar into the upper 90’s and coupled with high humidity, be a cause for health concern.  When deemed by the Camp Health Officer and Camp Director to be too hot and humid, some physical activities will be limited.  In some extreme cases the camp schedule will be altered to help protect campers.  This should occur if the heat index meets or exceeds 105 degrees.

    Dehydration is a major concern and EVERYONE should have a water bottle in their possession at all times.  Camper's should avoid sodas and high sugar foods to help combat dehydration. Water is always available in all program areas and ice water is available in the dining hall.  Water is preferred over " hydration" drinks.

    Lighting/ Thunder/ High Water

    If lighting is seen or thunder is heard, all unprotected outdoor program areas will be limited or shut down for safety reasons.  These programs areas will be limited or closed until no lighting is seen or thunder is heard for 30 continuous minutes.

    Flash Floods:

    While most areas of camp are not prone to this, there are areas to be aware.  Gullies, ravines, or major water shed areas should be avoided before, during, and shortly after rain storms.  Some ravines do not take much water to create raging streams and rivers.  Many times the rushing water can appear with no warning.  Avoid setting up campsites in these areas. If you find yourself in a situation where you are near or by a flash flood area, do not attempt to cross or wade” through.  Currents can be extremely strong even with low levels of water.  Map out your area and avoid these places and "Be Prepared" in cases of emergency to avoid flash flood areas.

    Communicable Diseases:

    To protect other campers and staff, persons with a potential communicable illness should not attend camp until cleared by a health care provider.  To combat the spread of illness, campers are encouraged to wash their hands with soap and water or apply alcohol gel multiple times during the day and especially after restroom use and before meals.  Hand sanitizers will be placed around camp (dining hall, restrooms, etc).  If a camper becomes ill during camp, they must report to the Camp Health Officer.  If after a short period the camper does not improve, the adult leader at camp will be consulted and it may result in a camper being removed from camp until a written release from a health care provider is obtained.

    Wildlife:

    One of the best opportunities of camp is to view wildlife.  While this is part of the camping experience, campers should refrain from coming into direct contact with wildlife.  While some contact is unavoidable, Scouts should take the opportunity to learn about some of the indigenous wildlife and how to protect themselves. A complete wildlife guide is located in the nature center, the Camp Health Office and the Camp Office.

    Man Made Hazards:

    There are times where hazards are created within the camp.  Occasionally, new construction or major repairs may cause hazards that do not normally exist.  If this happens, those areas will be roped off and marked by the Camp Ranger.  Scouts and Leaders should avoid these areas at all times and abide by the posted warnings.   Leader and Scouts will be informed whenever possible about these hazards.

    Use of Cell Phones and 9-1-1

    If an emergency occurs, inform Camp Management or the Camp Health Officer immediately.  Please do not call 9-1-1 from your cell phone as too many calls to 9-1-1 can delay response time.  The Camp Director and Camp Health Officer will arrange the most efficient means of emergency response as previously established with local emergency personnel.

    Cell phone use by campers, while highly discouraged, is considered to be a unit responsibility to determine and monitor.  If allowed to have phones, campers should be informed of this policy.

     

    Reviewed and updated 6/1/2020

    MVC Risk Management Committee

    SSR Emergency Action Plan

    The best way for your unit to keep safe during emergencies at camp is to “Be Prepared”.

    Discuss this plan in detail during a unit meeting and make sure that families know the process as well. Because most severe weather will take place during early evening or night you should

    make yourself very familiar with the following procedures and designated areas. There will be a separate plan for designated areas that happen during program times, those will be gone over in detail during the Leader meeting at camp.

    We will be running a mock drill starting approximately 5:30 p.m. the Sunday of Summer Camp.

    Severe Weather:

    Severe Thunderstorm Warnings, High winds, heavy rains, flash flooding, Tornado Warnings, etc

    1. Leaders will be informed when possible of severe weather warnings and watches as it approaches through Camp Management or
    2. When instructed (by staff or by long continuous siren) leaders will gather Scouts and go to designated area making sure to keep close count of all Scouts and leaders. In the case of flash flooding units will be informed and told to stay out of flash flooding

    Leaders to make sure that Scouts stay calm and stay together and have a complete count of Scouts and Leaders and immediately report any missing Scout or Leader.

    1. The following areas have been designated for emergencies:
      1. Ridge 1 (Navajo and Staff Row)-must head to dining hall and gather in restrooms
      2. Ridge 2 (Kiowa, Ute, Comanche)-must head to Winter Cabin
      3. Ridge 3 (Sauk, Dakota, Potawatomi, Ojibwa, Chippewa, Staff Sheep Sheds)-must head to shower house
      4. Ridge 4 (Cayuga, Huron, Seneca)-must head to Women’s Shower House
      5. Jambo side –must head to Polar Bear Cabin

    Upon arrival in your designated spot please do a head count of all Scouts and Leaders and report to the staff person in charge. Have all youth sit, away from any windows when possible and help keep Scouts calm

    1. When the “All Clear” sign has been sounded or announced by Camp Management report to the court of flags for head count and instructions by Camp Director

    Fire:

    In the event of a fire (pulse sounding siren), campers and staff will assemble at the flag pole and take a headcount. If the flag area is inaccessible, camp will assemble at the Archery Range.

    Visitors at Camp:

    Visitors at camp are always welcome but should notify the unit leadership. All visitors must check-in and out at the Trading Post. Once signed in, a wrist band indicating them as an authorized visitor will be distributed and worn at all times. If a Scout or a Leader notices an unauthorized visitor in camp (has no visitor band, camper wristband, or staff identification) they are to report it to Camp Management IMMEDIATELY. ALL UNAUTHORIZED VISITORS WILL BE ASKED TO SIGN IN AND OUT OF CAMP OR ASKED TO LEAVE CAMP

    IMMEDIATELY. Overnight guests cannot be accommodated unless they are a registered camper.

    Release of Campers:

    If a camper must leave camp for any reason, they will need to have a formed filled out by the leader at camp and on file with the Camp Office. This form will state the purpose and will also name who may and may not pick up the camper. Camp management should be informed of special circumstances. The adult picking up the camper must present a picture ID and also sign and date the release form.

    Verification of absent Scouts/ no-shows:

    During check-in, leaders will review and correct the roster for any absent Scouts or no-shows. Leaders should be aware of why a Scout did not show for camp or be able to announce when they will be arriving.

    High Temperatures

    Summer temperatures can soar into the upper 90’s and coupled with high humidity, be a cause for health concern. When deemed by the Camp Health Officer and Camp Director to be too hot and humid, some physical activities will be limited. In some extreme cases the camp schedule will be altered to help protect campers. This should occur if the heat index meets or exceeds 105 degrees.

    Dehydration is a major concern and EVERYONE should have a water bottle in their possession at all times. Camper's should avoid sodas and high sugar foods to help combat dehydration. Water is always available in all program areas and ice water is available in the dining hall.

    Lighting/ Thunder/ High Water

    If lighting is seen or thunder is heard all, unprotected outdoor program areas will be limited or shut down for safety reasons. These programs areas will be limited or closed until no lighting is seen or thunder is heard for 30 continuous minutes.

    Flash Floods:

    While most areas of camp are not prone to this, there are areas to be aware. Gullies, ravines, or major water shed areas should be avoided before, during, and shortly after rain storms. Some ravines do not take much water to create raging streams and rivers. Many times the rushing water can appear with no warning. Avoid setting up campsites in these areas. If you find yourself in a situation where you are near or by a flash flood area, do not attempt to cross or “wade” through. Currents can be extremely strong even with low levels of water. Map out your area and avoid these places and "Be Prepared" in cases of emergency to avoid flash flood areas.

    Communicable Diseases:

    To protect other campers and staff, persons with a potential communicable illness should not attend camp until cleared by a health care provider. To combat the spread of illness, campers are encouraged to wash their hands with soap and water or apply alcohol gel multiple times during the day and especially after restroom use and before meals. Hand sanitizers will be placed around camp (dining hall, restrooms, etc). If a camper becomes ill during camp, they must report to the Camp Health Officer. If after a short period the camper does not improve, the adult leader at camp will be consulted and it may result in a camper being removed from camp until a written release from a health care provider is obtained.

    Wildlife:

    One of the best opportunities of camp is to view wildlife. While this is part of the camping experience, campers should refrain from coming into direct contact with wildlife. While some contact is unavoidable, Scouts should take the opportunity to learn about some of the indigenous wildlife and how to protect themselves. A complete wildlife guide is located in the nature center, the Camp Health Office and the Camp Office.

    Man Made Hazards:

    There are times where hazards are created within the camp. Occasionally, new construction or major repairs may cause hazards that do not normally exist. If this happens, those areas will be roped off and marked by the Camp Ranger. Scouts and Leaders should avoid these areas at all times and abide by the posted warnings.

    Leader and Scouts will be informed whenever possible about these hazards.

    Use of Cell Phones and 9-1-1

    If an emergency occurs, inform Camp Management or the Camp Health Officer immediately. Please do not call 9-1-1 from your cell phone as too many calls to 9-1-1 can delay response time. The Camp Director and

    Camp Health Officer will arrange the most efficient means of emergency response as previously established with local emergency personnel.

    Cell phone use by campers, while highly discouraged, is considered to be a unit responsibility to determine and monitor. If allowed to have phones, campers should be informed of this policy.

     

    Reviewed and updated 6/1/2019 Douglas Peters, MD and

    Risk Management Committee

    Unauthorized Person Entering Camp

    To be distributed to all leaders and staff at Summer Camp and all other events
    *In the case that an unauthorized person is seen in camp, the following procedure will be followed:
    1. All authorized campers (adult and youth) will wear colored wrist bands. Parents and other family members visiting camp must check in at the Trading Post, sign in, and receive a wrist band.
    2. If any camper or staff member observes an unauthorized person entering camp, they are not to approach the person under any circumstances.
    3. The camper or staff member should immediately alert the Camp Director or Program Director (or Chairmen of Event or Professional Scouter on location) to the location of the unauthorized person. This should be done directly without alerting any other staff members.
    4. Once the Camp Director or Program Director is alerted, they will take the necessary action. The Director will take no less than two other staff members and proceed to the last location the person was seen. While the director and staff approach the person there will be at least one other staff member in the Camp Office who is in radio contact with the Director. If the unauthorized person is one that is to be escorted off the camp property with additional assistance (police, county sheriff), the staff member in the office will contact the necessary authorities.
    5. The Director will speak to the unauthorized person to determine the identity of the person and why they are in camp.
    a. If it is determined that the person would be approved to be in camp (parent, troop leader), the Director will instruct the Camp Office to lower the warning. To determine if the person is to be in camp, the Director will check the person’s driver license and confirm with the unit leader. The person will be taken to the Camp Office (or Trading Post) to be formally authorized to be in camp.
    b. If the Director decides the threat level of the authorized entrant is high, then the staff at the office will be alerted and will proceed to call the proper authorities. While authorities are in route, the staff will do what they can to keep the authorized person at the location without physical restraint.
    6. If the unauthorized person is confirmed but cannot be located, the Camp Director will call for a full camp assembly. The Program Director will account for all campers and staff in camp.
    7. In the case of Family Night at camp it is asked that all guest sign-in at the Trading Post and, within reason, stay with their troop at all times as not to be seen as an unauthorized person. Upon completion of Family Night activities all vehicles not authorized to be at camp will be accounted for and operators will be asked to receive permission to be at camp or asked to leave. If the owner/ operator cannot be located it will be assumed that there is an unauthorized person in camp and proper procedures will be followed.
    8. The camp staff will review and adjust procedures to insure protection of campers. Unit Leadership will be informed as well.

    Written Communication Procedures for Camp

    1. There will be a working landline telephone system at camp and at minimum these places will have working telephones with emergency contact numbers posted by the phones at all times:

    • a. Camp Office
    • b. Trading Post
    • c. Dining Hall
    • d. Ranger Office
    • e. Health Lodge

    2. In addition authorized camp personnel will have radio communication at minimum

    • a. Camp Director
    • b. Program Director
    • c. Health Officer
    • d. Ranger
    • e. Aquatics Director
    • f. Waterfront Director
    • g. Shooting Sports Director (and staff such as Archery Director, Shotgun Director, Rifle/ BB Director)
      h. COPE/ Climbing Director
    • *Others may be assigned radios as directed by the Camp Director and may include other program
      areas or specialized staff*

    3. In addition it is encouraged (and mandated for Camp Director, Ranger, Program Director, Health Officer) to have access to cell phone use as a backup to landline and radios.

    4. Health emergency communications should be directed to the Health Officer (with communication with the Camp Director)
    *In the event of emergency transportation or serious injury the Camp Director will notify the Professional Advisor to Camp or the Scout Executive.

    5. All other emergencies should be directed towards the Camp Director
    *The Camp Director should alert the Professional Advisor to the Camp and the Scout Executive*
    *Youth Protection issues are required to contact the Scout Executive immediately*

    6. In the case a parent or unit leader that is not present at camp, needs to be called the Camp Director will be authorized to make the call.

    7. All media inquiries will first be directed to the Camp Director who will then alert the Professional Advisor to the Camp and the Scout Executive.
    *At no time should media be allowed to enter camp without prior permission from the Scout Office*
    *At no time are Staff members allowed to communicate with the media without prior approval from the Scout Executive* Mississippi Valley Council 2522 Locust St. Quincy, IL 62301 www.mississippivalleybsa.org

    Aquatics Emergency Action Plan

    Emergency- A serious accident or injury has occurred or there is an immediate threat of injury or death to one or more persons.

    Emergency Response Coordinator- The aquatics director is the emergency response coordinator. He has direct communication (two-way radio, wireless phone, or runner) with the emergency response team (camp director, health officer, ranger, etc.). If the aquatics director leaves the waterfront, he will designate an acting director and ensure all waterfront personnel are aware who the acting director is.

    Safety Boat -  A boat designated for use in transporting equipment and personnel to the scene

    of an accident or injury. The boat may be pre-loaded or equipped with a first aid kit, breathing barrier, backboard, or AED. The boat may be either human-powered(paddle or oars) or motor-driven (electric or gasoline), depending on the anticipated distance.

    Inside the Swimming Area

    1. Active drowning, distressed, or submerged victim:
      1. Notify-The guard who sees the victim activates the emergency action plan using the predetermined signal (e.g., "Rescue!")1. Other guards echo the activation and point to the guard making the rescue. This is to ensure the emergency response coordinator is aware of the situation and knows who is
      2. Perform rescue:
        1. Perform the appropriate
        2. Other guards adjust to provide backup
    • Designated guard brings first aid kit (with CPR breathing barrier) and AED

    (if available).

    1. Emergency response coordinator contacts the camp medical officer and camp director (e.g., "Distressed swimmer. Rescue in ").
    1. Post-rescue:
      1. Call for a buddy check and clear the swim area if directed by the emergency response
      2. Provide first aid as
      3. ii) Replace rescue equipment.
    2. Conduct an incident
    3. Provide post-incident
    4. Missing swimmer:
      1. Notify:
        1. Activate the emergency action plan (e.g.,"LBD").
        2. The emergency response coordinator contacts the camp director and camp medical officer with the missing person's name and last known location and assigned
    • Clear the swim

     

    1. Search:
      1. The camp director directs camp staff to look for the missing swimmer in other parts of camp (campsite, dining hall, ).
      2. Two guards begin an immediate search of the last known location of the missing
    • The designated guard brings masks and fins to the search
    1. Additional guards perform an underwater line search of the entire swim area beginning with the last known location of the missing swimmer.
    1. Post-rescue:
      1. Provide rescue breathing or CPR as required.
      2. Provide "near drowning"
    • Replace rescue
    1. Provide post-incident counseling for witnesses and

    Outside the swimming area (boating area or open-water swim area):

    The condition of the victim or the type of injury will determine the level of response.

    Injury, responsive victim -     A responsive victim is able to follow instructions from the responding guard. He is able to grasp a reach pole, flotation device, or actively assist with transfer into a rescue boat. Time is not critical, and assistance is available from other guards or instructors.

    Injury, incapacitated victim -     The victim is not able to respond to instructions from the guard. He may be able to respond to questions from the guard to assist in determining the degree of the incapacitation. The guard needs assistance in transporting the person to the boat dock or removing the person from the water.

    Life threatening injury -     Time is critical. The person needs or potentially will need advanced life support.

    1. Notify - When an accident or incident occurs while on the water and away from the boating launch area, use the following signals to activate the emergency action plan:
      • Attention, assistance required - One 3-second blast from a whistle or horn; paddle, oar, rescue tube, or arm raised vertically overhead; call out,"Injured boater!"
      • Urgent, life threatening situation - Three 3-second blasts from a whistle or horn; paddle, oar, rescue tube, or arm(s) waved overhead; radio call: "MAYDAY." Contact the camp medical staff, direct them to call 911 and request emergency medical services (EMS) immediately. Respond to the scene with the first aid kit and other emergency
      • All clear -Two 3-second blasts from a whistle or horn; paddle, oar, rescue tube held horizontally overhead; arms extended parallel to ground; finger and thumb forming "OK signal" or "thumbs up" signal {no assistance required, situation resolved).
    2. Respond-Provide assistance to the victim:
    3. Responsive victim - provide first aid or spinal injury management Return to the boat launch or
    4. Incapacitated victim - provide first aid or spinal injury With the assistance of

    another guard, remove the victim from the water. Return to the boat launch or dock.

    1. Life threatening injury - If CPR is required or may be required:
      • Open-water swimming (Mile Swim) - Move the victim to the nearest shore or dock where it is practicable to perform CPR. One guard rows while the other holds the victim at the transom of the guard boat (rowboat). Other guards will use the safety boat to bring the AED and first aid equipment to the

     

    • Canoeing - Administer CPR or paddle the victim to the nearest shore or dock where it is practicable to perform CPR. If the victim is in the water and too large to quickly bring into the canoe, one person can hold onto the victim while the other person Other guards use the safety boat to bring the AED, spinal injury board, and first aid equipment to the scene.
    • Rowing - If able, administer CPR onboard. Otherwise, row to the nearest shore or dock where it is practicable to perform CPR. If the victim is in the water and too large to quickly bring into the rowboat, one person can hold onto the victim at the transom while the other person rows. Other guards use the safety boat to bring the AED, spinal injury board, and first aid equipment to the
    • Sailing - If able, administer CPR Otherwise sail or paddle the sailboat to the nearest shore or dock where it is practicable to perform CPR. If the victim is in the water and too large to quickly bring into the sailboat, one person can hold onto the victim while the other person paddles or sails the boat. Alternatively, attach a line to the victim and tow him or her to the nearest shore or dock where it is practicable to perform CPR. Other guards use the safety boat to bring the AED, spinal injury board, and first aid equipment to the scene.
    • Motor boating - If able, administer CPR onboard. Otherwise, go to the nearest shore or boat dock where it is practicable to perform If the victim is in the water and too large to quickly bring into the boat, one person can hold onto the victim while the other person steers the boat to the nearest shore or dock. If the victim is in the water, moving the boat in reverse will prevent injury by the propeller. Other guards use the safety boat to bring the AED, spinal injury board, and first aid equipment to the scene.
    • Kayaking (flat-water instruction)
    1. Sit-inside kayak- Use a line to tow the victim to the nearest shore or dock where it is practicable to perform CPR. Other guards will use the safety boat to bring the AED and first aid equipment to the scene.

     

    1. Sit-on-top kayak- Place the victim on the kayak, and paddle to the nearest shore or dock where it is practicable to perform CPR. Other guards will use the safety boat to bring the AED and first aid equipment to the

    Severe Weather (lightning, high wind, hail, tornado)

    1. Notify:
      1. Activate the emergency action plan (signal: attention or urgent).
      2. Contact the camp ("Se ere weather approaching. Securing the waterfront.")
    2. Recall-Signal (using bell) all watercraft to return to the Remove all swimmers from the swim area. Move all Scouts, leaders, and guests to the designated shelter area.
    3. Secure - Bring watercraft ashore, secure sails, secure all loose equipment as time permits.
    4. Shelter-Move tothedesignated severe weather
    5. Post-incident actions - Document actions taken, perform safety checks, brief supervisors (aquatics director, camp director, medical officer, camp ranger).

    Accident or injury

    1. Notify:
      1. Activate the emergency action plan (signal: assistance required or life threatening situation).
    2. Contact the camp medical officer if the injury is severe or life threatening.
    3. Survey the scene - Look to determine it is safe to approach the victim.
    4. Care - Provide first aid and treat for shock until medical assistance arrives.
    5. Post-incident actions - Document actions in the First Aid Log, replenish first aid supplies, replace emergency equipment, eliminate or minimize any contributing hazards, brief supervisors (aquatics director, camp director, medical officer, camp ranger).

    Fire

    1. Notify:
      1. Activate the emergency action plan (signal: urgent).
      2. Contact the camp director
    2. Evacuate - Move all Scouts, leaders, and guests away from the fire.
    3. Escort - Send a staff member to the main service road to meet firefighting personne
    4. Extinguish- Attempt to extinguish the fire after everyone is away from the
    5. Post incident actions - Document actions taken, perform safety checks, brief supervisors (aquatics director, camp director, medical officer, camp ranger).

    Fighting

    1. Notify:
      1. Activate the emergency action plan (signal: attention or urgent).
      2. Contact the camp
    2. Isolate - Restrain or separate the persons involved in the
    3. Care - Provide first aid as required.
    4. Post-incident actions - Get identification and a statement from each witness to the incident. Brief supervisors (aquatics director, camp director, medical officer, camp ranger).

    Disruptive Behavior

    1. Notify:
      1. Activate the emergency action plan (signal: assistance required).
      2. Obtain assistance consistent with the severity of the situation (other staff member, aquatics director, adult leader).
    2. Isolate - Move the person away from the program area to discuss the Alternatively, move participants away from the person.
    3. De-escalate -Ask theperson to leave the
    4. Post-incident actions - Document actions taken and brief supervisors (aquatics director, program director, camp director).

    Intruder (An unauthorized person uses threatening behavior or causes a disturbance.)

    1. Notify:
      1. Activate the emergency action plan (signal: assistance required).
      2. Contact the camp director
    2. Isolate - Move all participants and staff away from the intruder. This may involve keeping all watercraft on the lake as opposed to recalling them to the shore or keeping all swimmers in the water or on the dock as opposed to clearing the swim
    3. De-escalate - Ask the intruder(s) to leave the Inform the intruder that the camp is private property. Do not provoke or argue with the intruder(s).
    4. Post-incident actions -    Document actions taken, seek counseling for participants and staff as needed, brief supervisors (aquatics director, camp director, medical officer, camp ranger) and law enforcement authorities, if required (e.g., police, sheriff).

    Weapon Threat (There is a person carrying a weapon and threatening to cause harm.)

    1. Notify:
      1. Activate the emergency action plan (signal: urgent)
      2. Contact the camp director
    2. Isolate - Move all participants and staff away from the threat. This may involve keeping all watercraft on the lake instead of recalling them to the shore or keeping all swimmers in the water or on the dock instead of clearing the swim
    3. De-escalate - Do not approach the person with the weapon. However, if the person approaches you, move away and do not attempt to disarm him or Ask them to lay down the weapon. Do not provoke or argue with the person.
    4. Post-incident actions - Document actions taken, seek counseling for participants and staff as needed, brief supervisors (aquatics director, camp director, medical officer, camp ranger) and law enforcement authorities (e.g., police, sheriff).

    Mississippi Valley Council 2021 Camp Health Care Plan

    NOTE: This plan is expected to be under continuous revision during the summer of 2021.Changes will be made based on interpretations, consultation with summer camp health staff,
    consultation with the Camp Physician, Mississippi Valley Council Risk Management Committee,
    and the local Health Departments.

    Health Officer

    Camp Health Officer is the onsite health professional. The Camp Health Officer shall have overall responsibility for all areas of the camp participants' health. Responsibilities will include staff orientation, supervision, and organization of the camp health services The Camp Health Officer will reside on camp property and should live within the Health Office and he/she or designee shall be available by radio or phone as needed by the staff on duty. He/she or designee should be able to be reached at any time by calling the numbers posted in the Camp Health Office or by radio. Key camp health staff will be assigned cell phones. Those on duty or call will have their cell phone charged and on their person. Radios will also be issued and will be assigned. Those on duty will have their radio charged and on their person. She or he also has the responsibility of making sure there is one full time camp health staff member present during normal office hours for the summer. The camp health staff members are required to be at camp for the entire time that the camp is in session.

    Policy for Written Health Record Requirements for Campers and Staff

    Health History: The current official BSA Health Form is required for each camper and for each staff member. The history must be less than twelve months old; therefore a new health history is
    required each year. Parts A and B are required for all participants in camp. Part C is also required for all participants in programs that are 72 hours or longer.

    Health Examination: A health examination is required for campers and staff participating in programs lasting 72 hours or longer. The physical will have been completed within a twelvemonth period of attending camp; therefore meaning a new physical is required each year for campers and staff. A physician’s signature and date are required if part C is completed.
    If the scout or counselor is a minor, parent or guardian written permission is required each year. Camper and Staff medical forms will be kept on file during each camp session and arranged by
    unit or staff in alphabetical order.

    A health logbook is to be kept by the camp health staff to record distribution of all medications and administration of medical care the campers and staff members. The log is kept in a labeled
    single, bound, numbered notebook or folder that is located in the camp health service office. The camp health staff is responsible for keeping the log current and must sign off on all care rendered.

    After a Unit arrives at camp, a leader is to meet with the Health Officer. The Health Officer will privately screen each Scout and leader form and verify all forms are current. Any specific
    questions on medications or physical needs will be handled privately with the individual Scouts. The Camp Director, appropriate staff, and unit leaders are informed of any scouts with
    limitations or special needs.

    All medications will either be locked in the Health Lodge or in an approved locked container in the campsite.

    First Aid

    First aid beyond the capabilities of unit leaders is to be administered by trained individuals. Individuals who are trained in first aid and CPR should talk to the Camp Health Officer during
    camp orientation to confirm training and understanding of emergency situations. First aid kits are located in all camp buildings and program areas. An appropriate supply inventory will be kept in the camp health office.

    ALL accidents and injuries need to be reported to the camp health staff. The camp health staff has the discretion for treatment or referral to the director. Camp health staff are required to
    record the history of injury and any treatment rendered in the First Aid Log. An accident form must be completed by witnesses/victims for any accident or injury incurred by campers or staff.
    ALL staff members will attend an orientation presentation by the Camp Health Officer to discuss basic health care principles and the needs of the camp participants.

    Emergency Medical Care

    Emergency medical care will be administered by the appropriately trained camp health staff. Refer to the physician's standing orders for authorized treatment and procedures.
    Emergency transportation and care will be readily available. Call 9-1-1 for any severe medical emergency. Other phone numbers are available by every camp phone. Staff members will
    notify the camp health staff or the Camp Director of any medical emergency. The following documents will be taken with the camper to the hospital: the medical form, HSR form, medication sheet, and insurance information if applicable.

    It is the responsibility of the camp health staff to record all pertinent information in the camp health log. It is also the camp director's responsibility to record information and events on the accident report form. Available witnesses will be asked assist with this duty.

    Routine Scheduled Medical Care

    Any required routine scheduled medical care of campers should be discussed with the parent/guardian or unit leader during the check-in time. All concerns should be discussed during this
    time. Any concerns or questions should be directed toward the camp health staff. Routine medical care for staff members is the responsibility of the individual staff member unless they become too ill to care for themselves. If a staff member does not feel well enough to work, he/she must see the camp health staff. Depending on the extent of the illness or injury, the staff member may be temporarily excused from his/her duties. If a minor, the staff member’s parent or legal guardian will be notified at the discretion of the Camp Director or Camp Health Officer. The staff member will be referred to his/her personal health provider upon request or at the discretion of the Camp Health Officer. Staff members will also be expected to attend a presentation on maintaining their own personal health. This discussion should include information on camp policies for lights out and quiet hours as well as information of general wellness and stress management. While it is up to each individual staff member to monitor his/her own health and seek assistance when needed, it may be necessary for appropriate staff to monitor staff health needs and quiet times.

    Supervision of overall camp health

    Camp health staff may have a better feel for the general health of the camp population and because of this they will have direct input to the Camp Director for possible changes in routine. Camp health staff should keep in mind the high degree of activity that the campers and staff members are experiencing and consider the weather, climate, and temperature. Modifications may need to be made to lengthen rest time, increase fluid intake, and avoid direct sunlight on warm and humid days. Changes in weather conditions need to be monitored closely. The camp health staff should periodically inspect the camp to ensure that staff and campers are following proper health practices, including camp sanitation practices. The camp health staff will have the authority, under the guidance of the Camp Director, to take appropriate action should there be a health concern that could affect other camp participants. The camp property is defined as: all land owned by the Mississippi Valley Council

    Food Service

    The camp health staff shall ensure that food service safety requirements are met. All food provided to campers must be prepared by licensed and inspected providers. Food prepared by the
    units must be stored in such a way as to prevent food borne illnesses and shall be checked periodically to ensure all requirements are being met. Procedures for health care and first aid of camp
    The following procedures should be followed for any out of camp trips, including hikes, Wilderness Survival, “Older Scout Programs”, ATV, walks off camp, trips to an off-camp pool, and boat/canoe trips:

    1. All groups must have a first aid kit and a two way radio or cell phone with them at all times. If a camper wants to take a walk away from the main camp, the Camp Director will be notified and the buddy system will be assured. Two deep leadership guidelines will be followed.
    2. Any accidents, first aid or emergency care provided on the trip or outing will be recorded and reported to the camp health staff as soon as possible. Information recorded should include what happened, when it happened, treatment given, and response to the treatment. If the situation is truly an emergency, a two way radio or cell phone should be used to notify the camp health staff immediately.

    Procedure for calling Emergency Services:

    In the event of an emergency always call 9-1-1
    *Only the Health Officer or Camp Director should call 9-1-1. If 9-1-1 is called by a person other than the Health Officer or Camp Director, they will be notified immediately.

    Orientation

    An orientation to familiarize the camp health staff stations and organize them to the most effective and efficient working space for the camp sessions will be held. Organizing the camp health staff office All supplies need to be organized and arranged to facilitate easy access and use. Arrange supplies by the category that they will be used.

    1. All medications and health supplies need to be examined and expiration dates identified. If expired, the medication or health supply should be discarded accordingly.
    2. Staff under the age of 18 are required to have controlled medications locked in the health service office. Staff members over the age of 18 are responsible for taking their own medications at the proper time as noted on their Health Form. He/she is to inform the Camp Health Officer prior to the start of camp.
    3. Inventory for the camp health staff equipment and supplies will be done prior to and after the summer camp season. A current list of supplies will be kept and given to the Camp
    Director. Supplies will be replaced as needed.
    4. Physician standing orders are reviewed and updated every year by the council camp physician advisor.
    5. It is the responsibility of the camp health staff to prepare and resupply the camp first aid kits on a regular basis. First aid kits are available at all program areas. The camp director will notify the camp health staff at least 24 hours in advance of any off camp activity.

    Camp Health Staff Presentation

    The camp health staff will give a presentation during camp orientation to educate staff about any health concerns related to camp. The presentation should include: procedures to facilitate  emergency and routine care for campers, personal care, seizure prevention and care, wheelchair safety, universal precautions, and first aid and CPR.

    The importance of allergy awareness regarding latex and insect bites or stings should be discussed. Address the issues of eating, drinking, and bowel habits. It is important to keep track of fluid intake and urinary output, especially in the summer time when campers are at greater risk for dehydration and heat related illnesses. Staff should monitor bowel habits in order to identify possible enteric pathogens. Staff take an important role in observing anything out of the ordinary such as a change in emotion, detection of an open sore or injury or detection of an illness.

    Staff members spend the most time with the campers and are an excellent source of information. Camp health staff will inform the general camp staff about the various methods of contacting health staff. An emphasis on emergency procedures regardless of time or situation should be made.

    Medication administration

    Medications will be administered at meal times and before bedtime, or as indicated on an individual basis. It is the responsibility of the parent/ guardian or unit leader to bring his/her camper to the camp health office for bedtime medication prior to "lights out". The Camp Health Officer and Camp Director will be notified of any special needs in dispensing of medications. If the camper fails to report for their medication within one hour of the scheduled time, the Camp Health Officer will do his/her best to locate the camper. The Camp Health Officer will notify the camper's health care provider if the dose of medication cannot be administered. The council's physician advisor may be contacted for clarification or if the camper's health care provider is unavailable.

    All medications will be kept in locked storage. Medications requiring refrigeration will be kept in a locked refrigerator at the camp health office. This refrigerator will be monitored for appropriate temperature range daily. Sharps containers shall be available if needed. Units are allowed to keep certain medications at the campsite in a locked storage box. The Camp Health Officer will be notified of this arrangement at the beginning of camp.

    Preparation for check-in

    Check-in is very busy and stressful but also the most important information gathering time of the week. Patience and calm are essential. Camp health staff should be dressed appropriately in field (class A) uniforms and present themselves professionally. Camp health staff should obtain the camper's records from the unit leader and alphabetize them in the file. Parents/guardians or unit leaders should be prepared to answer questions regarding camper medical care, medical conditions, allergies, current medications, treatments, bowel habits, eating habits, the best way to administer medications and any condition or injury that the camper has at check-in time. This may be the only time the camp health staff will be able to ask specific questions, so take the time to get a complete medical picture of the camper.

    Ensure that the camper has enough medication to last for the entire camp session. The medications should be placed into bags labeled with the camper’s name. The BSA requires detailed labeling for medications. Each medication is to be sorted and placed in a separate labeled plastic bag and reviewed for correct name of the camper, the correct prescription and accurate dosing route and time. Controlled substances require an accurate recorded count at check-in and check-out. Preprinted forms will be available for common medications. Detailed forms should be created for the unusual medications by using on-line resources or a commercial computer database. The BSA health form medication list is to be reviewed and reconciled. When dispensing medications, health staff should be aware of those present to avoid accidental ingestion of medications. Ensure that medications needed for the check-in day and evening are dispensed.

    Make sure that all of the needed supplies are available before check-in, such as a large supply of plastic bags, pens, paper, and files. Ensure an adequate supply of current BSA health forms as
    many camper's will not have brought one. Ensure required health form signatures are completed. Follow the standard procedure to organize the medications for the mealtime and bedtime medication passes. The time between registration and supper is usually very limited so diligent organization will help you to prepare for the medication pass. In the past it has worked best to
    write out the name of the camper who has a supper or bedtime medication and focus on preparation of that medication for distribution. You will have plenty of time later to organize the rest of the camper medications.

    Medication organization

    Medication organization and administration requires patience, efficiency and attention to detail. The camp health staff has the responsibility to organize the medications to the best of their ability to make administration efficient and organized. After the medications have been collected and labeled by camper name they may be organized for distribution. Medications are to be kept safe and appropriately stored so that they are not spilled, mixed or damaged. The evening medications are to be administered at the camp health office. Unit leaders should accompany the camper after-hours. The camper or staff member is to be identified and the appropriate medication(s) identified and verified prior to administration. Medications are to be pre-packaged with needed supplies when a camper is leaving camp to go to alternative locations. It is the responsibility of the Camp Director to ensure staff with the proper certifications escort campers on overnight and off campus trips.

    Medical Care

    The Camp Health Officer and camp health staff should treat ill or injured campers or staff members to the best of their abilities. The BSA health form should be reviewed at the time care is
    rendered. Information from participants parent/guardian or unit leaders should be clarified at check in time and any health questions or concerns should be resolved at that time. Again, the Camp Health Officer or Camp Director may refer any camp participant to his/her health care provider for definitive medical treatment upon request or for care beyond the comfort level of the camp health staff. Severe medical emergencies shall initiate a 9-1-1 call for possible medical evacuation from camp. The camp health staff will stabilize the victim to the best of their abilities with available resources.

    Blood borne Pathogens-Exposure control plan

    *Refer to the “Blood Borne Pathogens-Exposure” form located in the Health Office. “Occupational exposure” can be interpreted quite broadly, but for our purposes it is acceptable to apply the term to camp health staff and other staff members who are expected to routinely provide first aid. All staff members need training to participate in the Health Care Plan. Information should include the transmission of blood borne pathogens and training in the use of universal precautions. All staff members should receive specific instructions on the use of gloves, along with an understanding of why precautions are important and when they should be used. Practices to reduce the risk of transmission and spread of infectious diseases should be used by all camp staff. Because the risk is minimal with the camp population, the only mandatory precaution in washing exposed skin is with soap and water. Cuts, open sores, and bleeding wounds should be managed in a manner as to minimize direct contact with blood or body fluids. However, under no circumstances should the urgent care of a bleeding camper be delayed because gloves are not readily available.

    Hand washing is necessary after any contact with blood or body fluids, and after removing gloves. Disposable gloves are in all of the first aid kits. Any questions about the use of gloves or
    first aid should be directed to the camp health staff. Antiseptic hand cleanser is also available in the first aid kits and in the dining hall. It should be reinforced that hand cleansing is the first line of defense against infection. In the event of a bite or scratch, the injury should be reported to the camp health staff and the area cleaned with soap and water and antibiotic ointment applied. The area should be covered with a sterile bandage and monitored for any signs of infection. An accident/incident report will need to be completed by those who witnessed the event.

    In the event of blood or bodily fluids being found on the floor or other area it is important to clean the area completely with a mixture of bleach and water in a 1:10 concentration. All cleaning supplies should be available from the Camp Ranger. The Ranger has been trained in safe procedures consistent with OSHA standards. A standard sharps container will be provided for disposal of all sharp objects and syringes. At the beginning of the summer camp session, the container can be picked up at the health office. At the end of the each camp session, the closed sharps container must be returned to the health office for disposal.

    Camp Health Staff - Standing Orders

    See Addendum for Current COVID-19 Pandemic Protocols When in doubt, ask for help. Everyone has differing levels of comfort and experience. Always review BSA health form for medication allergies or intolerances and current medications. Routine use of aspirin is not recommended.

    Definitive medical care refers to the individual's personal health care provider, urgent care center or local emergency center as indicated for the severity of illness or injury. The Health Office is available 24 hours a day in case of emergency.

    The following standing orders are for the use at camp during normal operations.
    1. Abrasions, Scratches, and Minor Cuts: Cleanse with soap and water and cover with dressing. Check and change dressing daily or more frequently as needed. Apply antibiotic ointment if there is concern for infection. Refer to health care provider if bleeding is difficult to control or the wound may require sutures.
    2. Splinters: Remove with tweezers and cleanse area with soap and water. Apply antibiotic ointment and sterile dressing. Change daily or more frequently if needed. For large or worsening infections, refer to health care provider.
    3. Infections: If mild and localized, wash with soap and water or soak and apply antibiotic ointment and sterile dressing. Change at least daily or more often if needed. Refer to health care provider for continued or worsening signs of infection.
    4. Severe Sprains, Strains, or suspicion of a Fracture: Immobilize, ice and arrange evacuation to definitive medical care. Keep individual calm and comfortable.
    5. Head injuries: If there was a loss of consciousness or the injury was not observed, notify the Camp Health Officer immediately and immobilize victim. The Health Officer should arrange for emergency evacuation. If seen and released, notify parents or Unit Leader and have camp staff observe injured patient for 24 hours. Place ice pack directly over injured area for twenty minutes. One hour later place ice on area again for twenty minutes. Person may be allowed to sleep but should be closely monitored. Seek definitive medical care if severe headache, persistent vomiting, seizures or abnormal behaviors occur.
    6. Bruises and bumps: Rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE). Apply ice pack periodically for 48 hours and then apply heat if muscle aches occur. Elevate extremities if swollen. Compression wrap if indicated.
    7. Foreign body in eye: Notify the Camp Health Officer immediately. The Health Officer should attempt to irrigate the eye or gently remove the foreign body if visible. Evacuate for definitive medical care if unable to remove foreign body or irritant.
    8. Bleeding: Apply constant pressure to site. Place a tourniquet as a last resort as most bleeding can be controlled with adequate pressure. Monitor extremity closely. Evacuate for definitive medical care if bleeding is not controlled with pressure. Treat minor wounds as above.
    9. Burns: Refer to Camp Health Office immediately. If the burn is deeper into the dermis or covers greater than 5% of the person’s body, cover with sterile dressing and arrange emergency evacuation for definitive medical care.
    10.Sunburn: Keep person out of the sun. Apply cool compresses and sunburn lotion. Administer oral acetaminophen 650 mg every 4 hours or Ibuprofen 600 mg with food
    every 8 hours as needed for pain relief. Maintain hydration.
    11. Swimming Accidents: For drowning or submersion accidents, remove person from water and activate CPR if necessary. If there are no spontaneous breaths or pulses call 911. For
    swimming accidents involving scratches, strains, or sprains, treat as above.
    12. Insect bites and stings: Antihistamine lotion should be applied and followed by a cool compress or dressing. Use 1% Hydrocortisone Cream TID if pruritic. If insect bite of sting leads to anaphylactic shock use Adrenalin 1/1000 i.e.: Epi Pens (0.3 cc for person 50–90 lbs and 0.5cc for person over 90 lbs) give SQ. Arrange for emergency transportation. The use of an Epipen ALWAYS requires transfer for medical monitoring.
    13.Elevated Temperature: Acetaminophen or ibuprofen according to age or weight.
    14.Athletes foot: Desinex powder or similar product to area. Wear shower shoes while in the shower. May use antifungal cream if Desinex is not effective.
    15.Constipation: Milk of Magnesia according to age. Typical dose is 15 ml daily.
    16.Diarrhea : Kaopectate, Pepto or similar product according to age for diarrhea. Avoid Imodium use until cause of diarrhea is established. Maintain a clear liquid diet until symptoms resolve. Remove from camp and refer to health care provider if diarrhea is persistent or contains blood.
    17.Sore throat: Salt water gargles and throat lozenges PRN. Ibuprofen or acetaminophen per age or weight. If soreness is associated with fever or tender lymphadenopathy, refer to
    health care provider.
    18.Ear Ache: Ibuprofen or acetaminophen per age or weight. If elevated temperature, drainage, persistent pain, or redness is present then refer health care provider.
    19. Cough: Over the counter cough medicine per label direction. If worsening cough, fever or shortness of breath, refer to health care provider.
    20.Headaches: Ibuprofen or Acetaminophen according to age or weight.
    21.Nasal Congestion: Oral antihistamine as directed on bottle as needed.
    22.Swimmer’s ear: Isopropyl alcohol applied to ear canal. Swim ear drops if available. Refer to health care provider if significant swelling or uncontrollable pain.
    23.Toothache: Ibuprofen or Acetaminophen according to age or weight . If redness or swelling of gum develops see health care provider or dentist.
    24.Asthma attack: Person may use prescribed inhaler or medication as needed or ordered. If breathing problems continue or worsen, call 911 for emergent evacuation. Oxygen may
    be applied by mask or cannula.
    25.Nausea and Vomiting: Assure that symptoms are not related to a heat illness. Encourage clear liquids. Slowly allow advancement of diet when symptoms resolve. See health care
    provider if associated with abdominal pain, hematemesis, fever or persistent vomiting.
    26.Tick Bites: Staff may remove with tweezers if tick is not tightly adhered to the skin. Grasp the tick head and gently pull for removal. Monitor for the development of a rash
    (erythema migrans). If rash appears, have person notify their health care provider when they return home. If tick is tightly adhered, transport for definitive medical care.
    27.Heat related illness: Remove to shade or climate controlled room if available. Use cool mist and fan to carefully decrease body heat. Encourage clear liquids (WATER). Avoid
    sugar or excessive salt containing fluids. Evacuate to local emergency center if individual becomes confused, lethargic, seizes, develops intractable vomiting, severe headache or
    other signs of heat stroke.

    Reviewed and updated 5/1/2021
    Douglas Peters, MD (Council Physician Supervisor) and MVC Risk Management

    COVID-19 Addendum (2021)

    The following guidelines will be in place due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

     

    The Mississippi Valley Council takes the health and safety of all of it’s camp participants, staff members and visitors very seriously and has implemented the following guidelines to mitigate the risk of spreading or contracting COVID-19.

    A zero tolerance is in effect and anyone not adhering will be dismissed from camp.

     

    Individuals age 65 and older or those with chronic health conditions that put them at higher risk for complications in the event of contracting COVID-19 should carefully consider their risk of attending camp during the current pandemic.

     

    Despite our best attempt to mitigate the transfer of COVID-19 at camp or scouting functions, we cannot guarantee the absence of risk in contracting the SARS-COV-2 virus.

     

    Guidelines may be updated at any time based on national, state and local health regulations and recommendations.

     

    1. All camp participants, staff members and visitors will undergo a detailed health screening upon entering This will include a body temperature reading and symptom questionnaire.
    2. Any camp participant, staff member or visitor who has a temperature of 100.4 degrees F/38.0 degrees C or greater, has tested positive for COVID-19 within the last 10 days, answers yes to any of the screening questions or has been directed to quarantine will not be allowed to enter camp.
    3. Any camp participant, staff member or visitor who develops a temperature of 100.4 degrees F/38 degrees C or greater or who develops symptoms as outlined on the questionnaire will be immediately sent home without exception. It is recommended  the individual contact their health provider.
    4. Face masks are to be worn covering both mouth and nose at all times except when eating, sleeping, swimming or outdoors when a 6 foot social distance can be maintained. They are to be worn at program and gathering areas.  Masking is required and is not dependent upon COVID-19 vaccination status.
    5. Unit leaders should screen their unit members daily and report any positive symptoms to the Camp Health Officer or Camp Director immediately. Staff members will be screened daily.
    6. Any individual with known direct contact within 6 feet for 15 minutes or longer to anyone with an active COVID-19 infection within the last 14 days should not enter camp unless they have received a COVID-19 vaccination within a minimum of 2 weeks and not more than 90 days time.
    7. Social distancing at a minimum of 6 feet will be enforced. Group size will be limited based on current guidelines. Gatherings of more than 30 individuals not associated with camp program or unit activities are not allowed.
    8. Frequent hand washing is essential and shall be enforced. Hand sanitizer will be readily available.
    9. Camp participants will need to tent alone or with immediate family within safe scouting guidelines.
    10. All dining activities will be followed as outlined by the Camp Director and dining staff.
    11. Camp participants will be expected to remain within their designated groups.
    12. All program areas may open or close based upon current risk and guidelines. This may include but is not limited to the pool or swimming area, playground, gaga pit, human foosball, climbing and bouldering wall, COPE course, waterfront and fire rings.
    13. All program and gathering areas will be cleaned with either soap and water or disinfectant as appropriate prior to and after each meeting or session.

     

    5/1/2021

     

     

    Douglas Peters, MD and MVC Risk Management Committee